CBRN Burn and Blast Medical Countermeasures Program

Enhancing the standard of care across the continuum of treatment for burn and blast trauma injuries with comprehensive, sustainable, and adoptable advanced medical products.

Burn Fire Icon

CBRN BURN AND BLAST MEDICAL COUNTERMEASURES OVERVIEW

The mission of the Burn and Blast Medical Countermeasures Program is to support development and integration of transformative medical countermeasures (MCMs) into routine care and to build national preparedness for mass casualty incidents. These include both natural and man-made disasters ranging from forest fires to improvised nuclear detonations and explosions.

Our investments address resource constraints anticipated during an emergency. Our goal is to reduce bottlenecks in the delivery of care to facilitate more efficient management of burn and blast trauma injuries. This program aims to develop life and limb saving treatments across the initial and definite care continuum.

Hear directly from the Biologist, Michael El-Shammaa, on CBRN Burn and Blast Program 2022 priorities.
BARDA Industry Day 2021
Michael El-Shammaa, Biologist with the CBRN Burn and Blast Program
Pre-recorded for November 3, 2021 Download Video Transcript

Burn and Blast Medical Countermeasures Investment Areas

Select Investment Area to Learn more

General Burn and Blast Traumatic Injuries

General Burn and Blast Traumatic Injuries

The General Burn and Blast Traumatic Injuries program aims to develop MCMs that reduce morbidity and mortality from injuries caused by burn and blast trauma. Trauma sustained during a radiological or nuclear event may be due to blast forces, projectile debris, or thermal radiation. The burn and blast traumatic injuries area of interest focuses on MCMs that can be used to detect, mitigate, and/or manage the consequences of physical trauma, including extremity fractures, internal and junctional hemorrhage, lacerations, penetrating trauma, and crush injuries.

Head and Neck Injuries in Trauma

Head and Neck Injuries in Trauma

The Head and Neck Injuries in Trauma program addresses gaps in treatment of head and neck injuries caused by internal brain hemorrhage, elevated intracranial pressure (ICP), or cervical spine injury. Products could address detection of neurotrauma or moderate to severe acute traumatic brain injuries (TBI), using either non-invasive or minimally-invasive technologies to help guide initial treatment. Products could also enable or provide minimally invasive therapeutic value to ultimately reduce morbidity and mortality.

Hemorrhage from Non-Compressible Trauma Wounds

Hemorrhage from Non-Compressible Trauma Wounds

The Hemorrhage from Non-Compressible Trauma Wounds program targets products that detect, locate, and/or provide rapid hemorrhage control. MCMs are sought to address injuries such as internal or external non-compressible hemorrhage from junctional wounds in the neck, axilla, groin, and torso.

Airway Access Complications in Trauma

Airway Access Complications in Trauma

The Airway Access Complications in Trauma program targets products that simplify or improve upper airway access for use in patients with impaired oxygenation in acute trauma. Products may also include technologies that could improve management of airway access in difficult to implement or rescue situations, or complement failed intubations (for example, due to body habitus or in pediatric use).

Non-Autologous Topical Products for Burn Wounds

person spraying product on arm burn

The Non-Autologous Topical Products for Burn Wounds program targets MCMs to reduce the severity and/or exacerbation of burn wounds and to promote healing. These products could decrease the need for surgical interventions such as autografting. MCMs could prevent or reduce burn wound conversion from a partial-thickness (second degree) to a full-thickness (third degree) wound by developing a synthetic and/or non-autologous product.

BARDA Programs

CBRN has a proven track record of developing life-saving medical countermeasures. We will continue to work with partners old and new to treat or prevent the medical consequences that result from CBRN threats.

ADDITIONAL REFERENCES